Fun Facts

Yay, random Pokémon-related facts you may or may not already know!

A couple of notes. First, there is no copyright on factual information, so you are free to talk about these individual facts elsewhere without crediting me; however, don't just copy and paste my list, or large chunks of my list, everywhere as if you were the one who put it together and did the write-up. That's called plagiarism.

Secondly, no, I do not want you to e-mail me more fun facts to put here. This page will obviously never have every conceivable interesting fact about Pokémon on it, so it's not as if I "missed" something if your favorite fact isn't here. This is just random stuff I've discovered that I find interesting; I'll add to it when something catches my attention. In fact, if you e-mail me additions, it makes me less inclined to put them up, because if I did put them up I could neither honestly credit you (again, there is no copyright on facts, and what if I knew that fact already and you reminding me of it just made me decide I wanted to put it up?) nor not do so (I'd feel like I was ripping you off somehow if I didn't). So please don't e-mail me more fun facts; all it will lead to is ruling those facts out as possible candidates for this page in the future. Or at least until I've forgotten you ever mentioned it to me.

Random Trivia

Fun facts that do not fit anywhere else.

  1. "HO-OH" can be read backwards and forwards, flipped horizontally or vertically or rotated 180 degrees without changing. No real five-lettered word in the English language is this flexible. (Well, Ho-oh is technically five characters, not letters, if you want to be pedantic. But it counts for all relevant purposes.)
  2. As of the sixth generation, at least one species of Pokémon evolves at every level from 14 to 45.
  3. Platinum randomly changed the names of at least six random trainers around Sinnoh. Many of them retained the same Pokémon or mostly the same as Diamond and Pearl, while others who kept the same name had their teams completely renewed, so the implication doesn't seem to be that they're different trainers. Some trainers also randomly switched places with other trainers on the same route.

Types

The type chart and its various oddities.

  1. In Red, Blue and Yellow, there was only one Dragon move, Dragon Rage, which deals set damage (40 HP), so Dragon's weakness to Dragon never actually came into account despite being written into the type chart in the instruction booklet. Raise your hand if you painstakingly raised a Gyarados to use against Lance's dragons.
  2. Somewhat similarly, while the R/B/Y type chart also truthfully tells you that Ghost is only weak to itself, the only Ghost attack that deals variable damage is Lick, with a base damage of 20 that makes it rather unimpressive as a super effective attack.
  3. Speaking of the R/B/Y type chart and the Ghost type, a lot of people missed the fact that in the original games, Psychic was immune to Ghost, not weak to it. This misunderstanding was propagated by the anime, which had a special subplot revolving around getting Ash a Haunter to beat Sabrina, when a Haunter would have been a horrible choice (not only should Ghost attacks not affect her Pokémon at all, but being partly Poison-type, Haunter would be weak to Psychic attacks).
  4. In the first-generation games, attacks using a special damage formula, such as Seismic Toss, Sonicboom, Dragon Rage, etc., ignored the type chart completely, including immunities.
  5. In R/B/Y like the later games, a dual-type Pokémon being attacked by a move that is super effective on one of its types and not very effective on the other will take normal damage; however, the games display a random-looking "It's super effective!" or "It's not very effective..." message anyway. (See the Experimentation section for a full explanation.)
  6. If, on the other hand, one of the defending Pokémon's types is weak to the move and the other is immune (in R/B/Y), you will not get the normal immunity message, which is "It doesn't affect [defendant]!"; you will instead always be told that "[attacker]'s attack missed!" This happens for example if you use Ground attacks on Zubat or Golbat (Poison/Flying).
  7. Every Pokémon type has been combined with at least eight other types, plus existing as a standalone - since there are eighteen types, this means every type has been combined with half of the types including itself. The least-combined type is Fairy, likely because it was only introduced in the sixth generation: it has been combined with Normal, Water, Electric, Grass, Flying, Psychic, Rock and Steel as well as being a standalone type. After Fairy, Normal and Poison have only ten combos to their name and Ice eleven.
  8. Meanwhile, the most-combined is Flying, which has now been combined with every single other type in addition to being standalone in Tornadus. Water has actually been combined with every other type as well, but one vital combination exists only in a leaked event legendary from X and Y, so "officially" Flying has it beat. On their heels come Grass (combined with everything except Fire and Dragon) and Ground (combined with everything except Fighting and Fairy).
  9. Despite being the most-combined type, however, Flying shares the honor of being the primary type in the fewest combos with Fairy - up until the fifth generation, Flying only existed as a secondary type barring Arceus holding a Sky Plate, and as of the sixth generation the only Pokémon with Flying as their primary type are Tornadus (pure Flying) and the Noibat family (Flying/Dragon). On the other end of the spectrum, Water has been the primary type in fifteen different combos so far, followed by Rock with thirteen and Bug with twelve.
  10. The only possible starter triangles (i.e. three types that are weak to one another in a rock-paper-scissors fashion and the same with resistances in reverse) other than the traditional Fire/Water/Grass are Rock/Fighting/Flying, Fire/Rock/Steel and Grass/Poison/Ground. (Before you send me an error report about it, no, Dark/Psychic/Fighting does not qualify. See the FAQ entry on the subject for details.) We are not likely to get such starter triangles, however; Fire, Water and Grass are both traditional and make sense as representatives of three elements while the other triangles are pretty much out-of-the-blue incidental relations that happen to emerge from the type chart.
  11. As a matter of fact, were they ever to introduce four starters in a "type square" with the current type chart - as long as we only consider the weaknesses/resistances of the "adjacent" types - the only possibilities would be Fire/Bug/Grass/Water, Fire/Grass/Ground/Rock and Rock/Flying/Grass/Ground. And for type pentagons, they'd have the possibilities of Fire/Bug/Grass/Ground/Rock, Bug/Grass/Ground/Rock/Flying and (as of the sixth generation) Fire, Steel, Fairy, Fighting and Rock. With the sixth-generation type chart, in fact, there exists at least one valid type polygon for each possible number of sides between three and nine inclusive, but none beyond that.
  12. As of the sixth generation, it is impossible for a simple two-type combination to have no weaknesses. There are several combinations with only one weakness, however: pure Normal (weak to Fighting), pure Electric (weak to Ground), Normal/Ghost (weak to Dark), Water/Ground (doubly weak to Grass), Poison/Dark (weak to Ground), Bug/Steel (doubly weak to Fire), and Ghost/Dark (weak to Fairy). Since there exist various abilities that provide functional immunities to certain types, Pokémon that normally have no weaknesses are therefore possible: Electric or Poison/Dark Pokémon with Levitate, Bug/Steel Pokémon with Flash Fire, and Water/Ground Pokémon with Sap Sipper. (The only such Pokémon that currently exist are the Tynamo family.) However, since then abilities are at play they can be bypassed by any Pokémon that has one of the Mold Breaker, Turboblaze or Teravolt abilities, any method of changing another Pokémon's ability such as Skill Swap or Entrainment, as well as some more specific methods such as Gravity and Smack Down negating Levitate.
  13. It is a common misconception, propagated by the Pokémon anime, that Rock Pokémon are immune to electricity, but Electric attacks are neutral against Rock-types. Likewise, many think that Rock Pokémon are resistant to Rock attacks, which are also neutral. Finally, Rock Pokémon are not weak to Ice attacks; that's neutral too. All of these misconceptions stem from the Rock-type's frequent combination with Ground, which is immune to Electric, resistant to Rock and weak to Ice.
  14. Ground Pokémon are immune to Electric attacks, but not to the Static ability. In the second generation, Steel Pokémon were similarly immune to Poison attacks but could still be poisoned through Beedrill's signature move Twineedle (which is a Bug attack, but can inflict poisoning).
  15. Karate Chop and Gust, some of the most obvious and basic Fighting- and Flying-type moves, were Normal-type in R/B/Y.

The Generation Gap

The Pokémon games and what changes and remains the same between generations.

  1. Fans aren't the only people who revamp old sprites to become new. The poses of many Gold, Silver and Crystal sprites show signs of having been heavily inspired by the Red/Green and Red/Blue sprites - usually Silver from Red/Green and Gold from Red/Blue, but sometimes the other way around and in a few cases even from Yellow. If you don't believe me, you can see some of the examples - and those are nowhere near all. (Some of those are a bit of a stretch, but others are plainly just revamps of the older ones.) Many of the FireRed/LeafGreen sprites are posed similarly to the original Green sprites, too.
  2. None of the Pokémon that were added into old evolution chains in the second, third or sixth generations evolve through a method that is possible to replicate in the older games (i.e. they use new items or game mechanics). Clearly they want to keep things somewhat consistent. This rule was broken a couple of times in the fourth generation, however: Lickitung evolves by levelling up when it knows Rollout (which it could learn by Move Tutor before) and Piloswine evolves by levelling up when it knows Ancientpower (which it could learn by breeding).
  3. Because Gold, Silver and Crystal were linkable with Red, Blue and Yellow, the Pokémon in G/S/C used the same Individual Value for both Special Attack and Special Defense, which in R/B/Y was the Special IV. This is one of the reasons G/S/C weren't linkable with the Advanced generation; in the Advance games, Pokémon have separate IVs for Special Attack and Special Defense and the values of all IVs range from 0 to 31 instead of 0 to 15.
  4. Between the second and third generations, all level 100 max stats (ignoring natures) rose by one. This is because the IV factor in the stat formula used to be twice the IV when the IV ranged from 0 to 15, so this meant it could be up to 30, but is now just the IV itself while it ranges from 0 to 31.
  5. Many people think that Waterfall was a new move in G/S/C, but it existed in R/B/Y - it was just learned only by Goldeen and Seaking, Pokémon that nobody uses, cares about or trains to level 39 (when Seaking learned Waterfall). Except me.
  6. Two generations have boldly fixed spelling mistakes from earlier generations: the third fixed the "Elixer" and "Max Elixer" items to be called Elixir and Max Elixir and added a space after the period in Mr. Mime's name, and the sixth fixed "Faint Attack" to be called Feint Attack, as well as adding spaces to various attack names that didn't have them before due to the twelve-character limit and changing "Parlyz Heal" to be called Paralyze Heal.
  7. When Shedinja was introduced in the third generation, one merely needed to raise a Nincada to level 20 and have an empty slot in the party to obtain one. However, it was frequently reported as requiring an empty Pokéball in the bag as well, and although this was fiction made up by fans who seemed to find it more logical, that rumour found itself into Diamond and Pearl and all later games: now one must have a regular Poké Ball in one's bag in order to get a Shedinja.

Species, Stats and Moves

Particular Pokémon species, their stats and the moves they learn.

  1. Magikarp can only learn Splash, Tackle, Flail and Bounce (via Platinum Move Tutor), but its apparent counterpart Feebas can learn quite a few TM/HM, Move Tutor and breeding moves, giving it a distinct advantage which one might not notice at first glance.
  2. Pseudo-legendaries (Dragonite, Tyranitar, etc.) have higher total base stats than the legendary trios (Articuno/Zapdos/Moltres, Raikou/Entei/Suicune, etc.).
  3. Azurill is a Normal/Fairy-type unlike its Water/Fairy-type evolutions and has a higher chance of being female (75% as opposed to Marill and Azumarill's 50%). This means one third of female Azurill will change sex when they evolve.
  4. In Red and Blue, Lickitung couldn't learn Lick.
  5. Nidorina and Nidoqueen can't breed, but Nidoran female can.
  6. The only Pokémon whose stats are not improved overall when it evolves is Scyther: both Scyther and Scizor have a base stat total of 500, but upon evolution forty points are taken off Speed and split between Attack and Defense. This may be because 500 is already quite a good base stat total - Scyther had the highest base stat total of all unevolved Pokémon (i.e. Pokémon with at least one further evolutionary stage) in the second and third generation, only outclassed by Porygon2 (base stat total 515) when it gained an evolution in the fourth generation.
  7. Speaking of the Porygon line, Porygon2 is unusually both smaller and lighter than its pre-evolution. This makes sense - Porygon is a manmade, virtual Pokémon, and technology generally evolves from large, clunky and unwieldy to small, sleek and light.
  8. Slaking's base stat total equals that of Groudon and Kyogre, to make up for its hindering ability. This includes a quite respectable base Speed of 100 (the same as for example Charizard), odd as that seems given its apparent laziness.
  9. On the other side of the spectrum, the final-form Pokémon with the lowest total base stats is Shedinja - obviously, this is because it has the unique Wonder Guard ability but a base HP of one to make up for it. The next Pokémon above it are Smeargle and Ditto, respectively, both of which also have very unique potential. After them, Luvdisc and Delibird are tied - and while Delibird at least has a signature move, Luvdisc doesn't seem to have any redeeming features at all. Poor thing.
  10. Bellossom is a unique Pokémon in many ways. It is smaller and lighter than its pre-evolved form, similar to Porygon2. It also loses a type (Poison) without getting a new type as a replacement, unlike every other evolution, and in Gold, Silver and Crystal, it even lost the ability to learn the Sludge Bomb TM which it previously had as a Gloom. As if that weren't enough, it has also gone through some of the most drastic color changes of any Pokémon: in the G/S/C games, it had a green body and a pink petal skirt and flowers; in the G/S/C Sugimori art, on the other hand, it had a dark blue body, red flowers and alternately green and yellow petals in its 'skirt'; and in both the sprites and Sugimori art of the subsequent generations, it has the flowers and skirt of the G/S/C Sugimori art while the body is light green.
  11. Bellossom is not the only Pokémon to have gone through significant color changes. For example, Bulbasaur originally had a blue body in its Sugimori art but is now closer to green; in Gold and Silver Spinarak was dark purple but is now green and yellow while the shiny form is dark blue/purple; and Jumpluff was all blue in Gold and Silver while the Sugimori art as well as the games from Crystal onwards have shown the cotton puffs on its arms as yellow.
  12. The shadows of Jumpluff's cotton puffs are square-shaped in Pokémon Colosseum.

Page last modified June 09 2014 at 21:29 GMT